Past Events

Romantic Illustration Network

Programme of Events 2014-15

The Political Economy of Book IIlustration. Friday 6 June 2014, 1.30pm – 5pm, British Academy: William St Clair (London IES); Brian Maidment (Liverpool John Moores); Anthony Mandal, Julia Thomas, Nicola Lloyd, and Michael Goodman (Cardiff). Supported by the University of Roehampton. Organised with the assistance of the British Academy. 

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The Artist and the Writer. Saturday 29 November 2014, 10 – 5.35pm, Institute of English Studies (Room 349, 3rd Floor), Senate House, London: Lynn Shepherd (Richardson scholar and novelist), Tim Fulford (De Montfort), Sandro Jung (Ghent); Sophie Thomas (Ryerson, Canada); Ruth Richardson (King’s College London; Cambridge); Mary L. Shannon (Roehampton). Supported by the British Association for Victorian Studies (BAVS), www.bavs.ac.uk, and the University of Roehampton. Organised with the assistance of the Insitute of English Studies.

Registration necessary: click to access the booking system. Places are FREE, but LIMITED.

Download the REVISED programme here.

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The Literary Galleries: Entrepreneurship and Public Art. Friday 27 February 2015, 10 – 5pm, Board Room and Duffield Room, Tate Britain, London: Frederick Burwick (UCLA), Luisa Calè (Birkbeck), Ian Haywood (Roehampton), Rosie Dias (Warwick), Martin Myrone (Tate). Supported by the University of Roehampton and the Bibliographical Society. Organised with the assistance of Tate Britain. 

Listen to the podcasts of the talks here.

Download the final programme here.

Please arrive at the Staff  Entrance by 10am, where you will be directed to the Board Room: download a map of the Tate and travel details here.

Please join us for a drink at the White Swan after the symposium.

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 The Art of Quotation and the Miniaturized Gallery. Saturday 6 June 2015, 10 – 5pm, The House of Illustration, London: Peter Otto (Melbourne), David Worrall (Roehampton/Nottingham Trent), Kate Heard (Royal Collection), Susan Matthews (Roehampton), Bethan Stevens (Sussex). Supported by the University of Roehampton and the Bibliographical Society. Organised with the assistance of House of Illustration.

This session follows two themes:

  1. Miniaturization: Drawing on Peter Otto’s work on virtual culture in the Romantic period, is the illustration a form of virtual gallery? How does visual meaning change when an image is resized?
  2. The Art of Quotation: How were literary quotations used to conceptualise visual images? How important are framing devices to the meaning of an image?

…and other related questions.

Registration is free, and includes free entry to the main exhibition.

Download the programme here. Lunch recommendations from The House Of Illustration are here.

To register, please email Mary.Shannon@roehampton.ac.uk, giving your name, job title, and institution (if applicable). Places will be awarded on a first-come, first-served basis, and there will be a waiting list.

We are also accepting applications for 3 Bibliographical Society Studentships of £60 each, to assist postgraduate students with attendance. 3 spaces are reserved for the successful candidates.

London-based and non-London based postgraduate students are all eligible: applications will be assessed on the basis of the relevance of your research to the work of the Network and/or the Bibliographical Society.

To apply, please send your CV, and a statement explaining how your research fits with the work of the Network and/or the Bibliographical Society (200 words max), to Mary.Shannon@roehampton.ac.uk by Monday 25th May. Successful candidates will be notified by Wednesday 27th May.

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Call for Contributions: “Printing Things: Blocks, Plates and Stones 1400-1900”

CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS
Title: Printing Things: Blocks, Plates, and Stones 1400-1900


Editors: Giles Bergel (Oxford), Elizabeth Savage (Institute of English Studies)
Advisory board: Sven Dupré (Utrecht), Caroline Duroselle-Melish (Folger), Maria Goldoni (‘Xilografie modenesi’), Paul Nash (Printing Historical Society), Marco Mozzo (Polo museale della Toscana) 

Deadline: 15 October 2018 via https://goo.gl/forms/eHAzaQUFklyMOmYv2
Queries: Gemma Cornetti at printingcolourproject@gmail.com

In all fields based on historical printed material, research conventionally focuses on the text, images, and other information that was printed. The objects used to produce that information (including cut woodblocks, engraved metal plates, and cast metal sorts) have been neglected. Many hundreds of thousands of these historical printing surfaces survive today. The vast majority are inaccessible to researchers because they are uncatalogued and often considered ‘uncatalogue-able’. However, as individual objects and as an untapped category of cultural heritage, these artefacts of printing offer a great deal of information that the finished prints, books, fabrics, and other printed materials do not.

As relics of historical crafts and industry, these objects fall outside the modern disciplines. This edited volume will respond to the need for a multidisciplinary introduction to what image-based fields calls ‘print matrices’ and text-based fields call ‘printing surfaces’. Following from the conference Blocks Plates Stones (London, 2017), the first facilitated discussion of the use of such objects in research, Printing Things will represent the state of research in this new and developing field. It will bring together object-based research, collection-level surveys, historical printing practices, ethical considerations of their storage and use (or non-use) today, methods for multiplying the originals (eg dabs, stereos, electros), and methodological studies. By doing so, it will offer frameworks for describing, conserving, curating, presenting and understanding these objects using new and existing paradigms. It aims to facilitate their introduction into historical research across the disciplines.

Contributions are sought from art historians, book historians, cultural historians, musicologists, science and medicine historians, typographers, and researchers in other fields based on historical printed material; material scientists and conservators; historically informed printers and printmakers; curators, cataloguers, librarians, and printing museum managers who care for these objects; and digital humanities specialists who are creating a new generation of tools for culling information from these objects. The book will focus on handpress work.


In addition to object- and collection-based case studies, theoretical perspectives might include: 

– What can print matrices/printing surfaces teach us that printed materials cannot, and vice versa?
– How should they be regarded: as artists’ tools; intermediary states of works of art; or works of art in themselves?
– Is there a value in considering woodblocks, metal plates, and litho stones together as a single category?
– What lies behind the sudden and recent increase in interest in these objects, and how can these objects inform those emerging research trends?
– How are they to be conserved, curated, presented and understood?
– Does the recent turn to object-centered cultural criticism (‘thing theory’) provide useful paradigms for their study?
– What are the ethical and critical issues around bringing them back into use as printing surfaces?
– What is their place within the systems of digital remediation and knowledge within which art and book history is increasingly practiced?

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