Blake Awakes: Reinvention, Revival and Rylands Collections

Blake Awakes: Reinvention, Revival and Rylands Collections, 1 May, 1-5pm

The Christie Room, The John Rylands Library, Manchester
This workshop will explore some of the ways in which the artistic vision of William Blake has been reimagined and reinvented in British art and culture, with a special focus on material held at the John Rylands Library.
Hosted by the John Rylands Research Institute, the event builds on previous Blake projects at the John Rylands Library, including the exhibition Burning Bright: William Blake and the Art and Craft of the Book, which explored Blake’s own work as a commercial engraver, and his legacy in the world of the book in the century after his death.
This workshop spotlights other themes relating to Blake and his legacy in material held at the John Rylands Library as part of continuing efforts to unlock Blakean materials in the collections. Topics include Blake himself as a re-inventor in his designs for Edward Young’s Night Thoughts (1795-97); reinventing Blake’s Songs in editions of the poems held in Rylands collections; and Blake and counter-culture, represented in modern literary archives held at the Library.
The event is free to attend, and open to all. Booking is essential as places are limited.
This event is funded by the John Rylands Research Institute.
1-1.15: Introduction (Christie Room)
1.15-2.15: 3 x 15 minute papers + discussion (Christie Room)
  • Lusia Calé (Birkbeck, University of London), ‘Disbound, Encircled, Unrolled: Physical and Metaphorical Materialities of the Book in Blake’s Night Thoughts’
  • Colin Trodd (University of Manchester), ‘Codifying Vision:James Smetham’s Monuments to William Blake’
  • Sarah Haggarty (University of Cambridge), ‘Blake’s namby-pamby? Responses in the Rylands Library to the childlikeness of Songs’
2.15-3.30: Collections Session (Bible Room) / Tea and Coffee Break (Christie Room)
The group will be split in half for refreshments and the collections session; the two groups will swap between the activities at 2.50. A virtual tour of William Blake’s Cottage and other materials will be available to view during the break.
3.30-4.45: 3 x 15 minute papers + discussion (Christie Room)
  • David Hopkins (University of Glasgow), ‘The Impact of Machines’: Blake, British Surrealism and the Machine’
  • Douglas Field (Blake & Counter-Culture), ‘Transatlantic Visions: William Blake, Allen Ginsberg and Michael Horovitz’
  • Jason Whittaker (University of Lincoln), ‘Here be Tygers: from composite art to sequential art’
4.45-5: Closing discussion (Christie Room)



London Nineteenth-Century Studies Seminar

The Autumn programme of the London Nineteenth-Century Studies Seminar features two sessions of interest to scholars of illustration:


3rd November: Historical Fiction

Dr Brian H Murray (King’s College London) and Prof. Rosemary Mitchell (Leeds Trinity)


8th December: Nineteenth-Century Illustration

Prof. Julia Thomas (Cardiff) and Dr Mary Shannon (Roehampton)


Information, including details of how to book, are available on the Institute of English Studies website.

Gender and Image Workshop

The Women’s Studies Group 1558-1837 will host its 2017 workshop on 6 May, on the theme ‘The Fruitful Body: Gender and Image’.

Attendees are welcome from any discipline and period covered by the group. Each attendee is asked to bring a 5-minute presentation on some topic exploring the workshop theme. Suggested topics include (but aren’t limited to): caricature, texts, novels, conduct manuals, medicine, philosophy, motherhood and women artists.

In addition to presentations and discussion, there will be a keynote address by Karen Hearn (UCL) on ‘Women, agency and fertility in early modern British portraits’.

Full details, including registration information, are available on the Women’s Studies Group website.

RIN event: Fred Burwick, ‘Staging Shakespeare’, public lecture at Westminster Archives July 19th 2016

‘Staging Shakespeare: picturing Shakespeare’s plays in the 18th and 21st centuries’.
Professor Fred Burwick, University of California Los Angeles

Tuesday 19th July 2016
6.30pm – 8pm
City of Westminster Archives Centre, 10 St Ann’s St, London, SW1P 2DE

Join us for an event to celebrate Shakespeare’s 400th Anniversary, with a free public lecture followed by a wine reception (sponsored by the British Association for Romantic Studies). Download the poster here.

RIN member Fred Burwick will share his expert knowledge of the Boydell Shakespeare Gallery, opened in Pall Mall in 1789. The talk will examine the extent to which any of the scenes in the Boydell Gallery might be presumed to represent how Shakespeare was actually performed during the period, and also consider present-day models of representation.

Prints from the Gallery will be on view, as well as a display about Shakespeare.

Places are limited so early bookings are advised: RSVP to City of Westminster Archives Centre, 10 St Ann’s St,London, SW1P 2DE
Tel: 020 7641 5180

Symposium, The Courtauld Institute of Art: Frazzled and Dazzled

Scrambled Messages Symposium: Frazzled and Dazzled

Friday April 29th 2016

Organised by: Prof. Caroline Arscott, The Courtauld Institute of Art

Free admission

Advanced booking required via eventbrite

Frazzled and Dazzled brings together scholars from literature, art history, media studies and archaeology to focus on the flow of data and scrambling of information as historical sites take on new functions, imagery reaches new audiences and social and natural appearances are understood to be liable to blur and deceive.  Nineteenth-century instances are considered alongside key contemporary phenomena.  The day will offer broad-ranging discussions of photography, newspaper illustration, and other aspects of communications technology as well as the bafflements and reveals to be found in Victorian detective fiction and evolutionary theory.  This symposium is organised by the research project ‘Scrambled Messages: the Telegraphic Imaginary, 1858-1900’ funded by the AHRC and focusing on the cultural effects of telegraphic technology.

Please see for further details and booking.

Lewis Walpole Library New Exhibition: “James Gillray’s Hogarthian Progresses”

“James Gillray’s Hogarthian Progresses”

Exhibition on view April 6 – September 16

The Lewis Walpole Library

154 Main Street, Farmington, CT 06032

Sequential narration in satiric prints is most famously associated with the “modern moral subjects” of William Hogarth (1697–1764): Harlot’s Progress (1732), A Rake’s Progress (1735), Marriage A-la-Mode (1745), and Industry and Idleness (1747) among others. HP_publicity-images_enews-lg-1Less well-known is the broad spectrum of legacy “progresses” produced by subsequent generations drawing both on Hogarth’s narrative strategies and his iconic motifs. James Gillray (1756–1815), celebrated for his innovative single-plate satires, was also among the most accomplished printmakers to adopt Hogarthian sequential narration even as he transformed it according to his unique vision. This exhibition presents a number of Gillray’s Hogarthian progresses alongside some selected prints by Hogarth himself.

Curated by Cynthia Roman, Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Paintings, The Lewis Walpole Library.

Exhibition open Wednesdays, 2-4:30 pm, and by appointment

Further information about the exhibition and associated programming

Birkbeck 19th C Forum: Tuesday 26 January, ‘Julia Margaret Cameron: New Discoveries’ with Marta Weiss and Colin Ford

Birkbeck Forum for Nineteenth-Century Studies
Spring 2016 Programme

The first event of the spring term for the Birkbeck Forum for Nineteenth-Century Studies will feature Marta Weiss (Victoria & Albert Museum) presenting on ‘Julia Margaret Cameron: New Discoveries’ with Colin Ford (Former head of the National Museum of Photography, Film and Television) responding. This event is presented in collaboration with the History and Theory of Photography Research Centre at Birkbeck, and will take place Tuesday 26 January 2016 from 6.00pm to 8.00pm in the Keynes Library, 43 Gordon Square, London, WC1H 0PD.

This seminar will explore the new material Martha Weiss discovered while researching the current must-see exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum, marking the bicentenary of the birth of Julia Margaret Cameron, 150 years after she first exhibited her work there. Colin Ford has worked extensively on this important photographer, most notably in the comprehensive catalogue Julia Margaret Cameron: Complete Photos (Getty, 2002).

The session is free and all are welcome, but since the venue has limited space it will be first come, first seated.

For further information on the exhibition, see:

Download Julia Margaret Cameron: Complete Photos (Getty, 2002) here:

For further information on the History and Theory of Photography Research Centre, see:

For further information on the Birkbeck Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies, see: