Summer Workshops

Dr Elizabeth Savage, RIN fellow-traveller and Lecturer in Book History at the Institute of English Studies, University of London, will convene two workshops in summer 2017 that may be of interest to RIN members. Full details of each course, including how to apply, are on the following pages:

 

‘The History of Printed Book Illustration’, Bodleian Libraries Centre for the Study of the Book, 26-30 June

The course is for those who work with early books as in any academic or professional capacity. In addition to seminars and examination of items from Bodleian collections, students will be instructed in the practical processes used to illustrate early printed books, in the Bodleian’s hand-press printing workshop. Practical printing instruction will be supervised by Richard Lawrence.

 

‘History of Colour Printing’, London Rare Books School, 10-14 July

This interdisciplinary, introductory course provides an overview of colour printing techniques in the West from manual techniques c.1400 through the development of chromolithography in the mid-1800s. Discussions will be based on the close analysis of many kinds of content, including text, images, music, diagrams, maps, scientific tools and mathematical figures. By discussing colour-specific issues in the design, production and use of printed material across diverse kinds of content, participants will learn how to identify the most common techniques for printing colour in the hand-press period.

 

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Event: Female Networks – British Women Artists 1750-1950 Postgraduate / Early Career Study Day

The Victorianist: BAVS Postgraduates

British Women Artists 1750-1950
Post-graduate/Early Career Study Day

—-Female Networks—-

University of Glasgow & Glasgow School of Art

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Thursday, 29 June 2017

British Women Artists 1750-1950, a Sub-Group of Tate’s British Art Network was founded in 2015 to provide opportunities for knowledge exchange between University-based scholars and museum/gallery-based curators/researchers and stimulate new thinking and exhibition projects around women’s art works. On 30th June 2017, the University of Glasgow and Glasgow School of Art will jointly host the Fifth Meeting of the Sub-Group on the theme of ‘Female Networks’, especially the kind of informal networks through which women furthered their study and practice as artists, designers and craft workers.

To mark the occasion, a postgraduate/early career study day is planned to take place on Thursday, 29th June to encourage reflection upon this rich topic in new and diverse ways. Questions might include: Why did women find networking necessary/desirable…

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Gender and Image Workshop

The Women’s Studies Group 1558-1837 will host its 2017 workshop on 6 May, on the theme ‘The Fruitful Body: Gender and Image’.

Attendees are welcome from any discipline and period covered by the group. Each attendee is asked to bring a 5-minute presentation on some topic exploring the workshop theme. Suggested topics include (but aren’t limited to): caricature, texts, novels, conduct manuals, medicine, philosophy, motherhood and women artists.

In addition to presentations and discussion, there will be a keynote address by Karen Hearn (UCL) on ‘Women, agency and fertility in early modern British portraits’.

Full details, including registration information, are available on the Women’s Studies Group website.

Picturing the News

February 5th marked the launch of the online exhibition, ‘Picturing the News: The Art of Victorian Graphic Journalism’, co-curated by Professor Cathy Waters and Dr Ruth Brimacombe and funded by the AHRC.

The resource examines the work of Special Correspondents William Howard Russel (The Times), George Augustus Sala (Daily Telegraph and Illustrated London News), and Archibald Forbes (Daily News), and the Special Artists William Simpson (Illustrated London News), Sydney Prior Hall (The Graphic) and Melton Prior (Illustrated London News). In addition to biographical information on these writers and artists, the exhibition examines their artistic practice, the techniques they used, and their influence on contemporary journalism and the ways that readers perceived foreign events.

‘Picturing the News’ also provides a range of examples of the artists’ work embedded within individual essays (which function as clear and well-developed interpretation panels for the various virtual ‘rooms’ or ‘areas’ of the exhibition), which can be expanded and examined in high resolution versions.

 

‘Object Lessons: The Victorians and the Material Text’

Editors Lisa Surridge and Mary Elizabeth Leighton have announced the publication of a special issue of Cahiers victoriens et édouardiens entitled ‘Object Lessons: The Victorians and the Material Text’.

According to the editors:

This volume offers a series of ‘object lessons’ on Victorian publications from broadsides to Bibles, asking what the material forms of these texts teach us about their significance in Victorian culture. Some of our contributors direct their attention to the neglected material forms of the Victorian period—the blank journal, the almanac, the broadside temperance ballad, the thumb Bible, the Illustrated London News’s special issue printed at the Great Exhibition of 1851, and magazines for blind readers. Others consider the under-studied original material forms of now-canonical texts, including the serial and first edition of Sketches by Boz (1836), the first ‘whole book’ written by Dickens as he emerged from his early journalistic career; the first edition of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (1865), whose page layout constructs an active child reader; and the neglected serial edition of Henry James’s The Turn of the Screw (1898), written as a marketable commodity by a writer who scorned—but could not afford to ignore—the commodity market. Spanning a temporal range from the 1820s to 1912, all contributions focus attention on the physical ‘book-object’ as nineteenth- and twentieth-century readers encountered it—in all its insistent physicality.

The full issue is available online at https://cve.revues.org/2861.