CFP: The Romantic Eye (Yale, 17-18 April 2015)

Please see below for a Call for Papers for an exciting-sounding symposium on the Romantic Eye at Yale this April.  The organisers are particularly keen to secure contributions from early career scholars (including people working on their doctorates).  Flights and accommodation will be provided for those invited to speak, so if you’re working on a topic in this area, this could be a really great opportunity.

(Taken from the BARS blog)

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The Romantic Eye, 1760–1860 and Beyond
April 17, 2015-April 18, 2015
Yale University
Yale-Conference-300x222

This symposium examines Romanticism as a shape-shifting cultural phenomenon that resists easy categorization. Focusing on the period from 1760 to 1860, the symposium embraces the amorphousness that has been ascribed to Romanticism historically by eschewing any limiting definition of it, seeking instead to explore the broad range of art and visual culture characterized as “Romantic” during this hundred-year span. We are interested in what the Romantic “eye” pursued and perceived, and how it set itself the task of recording those perceptions. In addition to interrogations of the relationship between the visual arts and Romanticism, we welcome papers on writers, composers, scientists, and philosophers whose projects engaged the visual. Papers also are sought for a special panel that will address the legacies of Romanticism in contemporary art.

This symposium coincides with a major collaborative exhibition organized by the Yale Center for British Art and the Yale University Art Gallery, The Critique of Reason: Romantic Art, 1760–1860, which opens March 6, 2015. The exhibition comprises more than three hundred paintings, sculptures, medals, watercolors, drawings, prints, and photographs by such iconic artists as William Blake, John Constable, Honoré Daumier, David d’Angers, Eugène Delacroix, Henry Fuseli, Théodore Géricault, Francisco de Goya, John Martin, and J. M. W. Turner. Talks that respond explicitly to works in the collections of the Yale Center for British Art or the Yale University Art Gallery are particularly encouraged, as are cross-disciplinary and comparative studies.

We are seeking presentations of thirty minutes in length. Graduate students and early career scholars are particularly encouraged to apply. Travel and accommodation costs will be covered by the organizers. Please e-mail abstracts of no more than three hundred words and a short CV or bio (no more than two pages) by February 2, 2015, to romanticism2015@gmail.com.

The symposium is cosponsored by the Department of the History of Art at Yale University, the Yale Center for British Art, the Yale University Art Gallery, and the Yale Student Colloquia Fund.

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Third RIN Symposium ‘The Literary Galleries’: REGISTRATION OPEN

Romantic Illustration Network Symposium
The Literary Galleries: Entrepreneurship and Public Art’
Supported by the University of Roehampton, the Bibliographical Society, and Tate Britain

We are  pleased to announce that the third RIN symposium is now OPEN for REGISTRATION.

Friday 27th February 2015, 10am – 5pm
Board Room and Duffield Room, Tate Britain,
Millbank, London SW1P 4RG

This symposium brings together the authors of the key scholarship on the literary galleries of the Romantic period: Fred Burwick (The Boydell Shakespeare Gallery, 1996), Rosie Dias (Exhibiting Englishness, 2013), Ian Haywood (Romantic Caricature, 2013), Luisa Cale (‘Blake and the Literary Galleries’, 2008; Fuseli’s Milton Gallery 2006) and Martin Myrone (Gothic Nightmares, 2006; John Martin: Apocalypse, 2011) in a venue that is itself a form of literary gallery (Tate Britain) to present new research and to debate the relationship of painting to illustration, text, and print.  To what extent did the literary galleries change the role of illustration in the Romantic period?

Registration:

Places are FREE but limited to 15 in total, excluding speakers and organisers. This is due to restricted access to the Print Room. To secure your place, please email Mary.Shannon@roehampton.ac.uk, providing your name, status/job title, and institution (for name badges). Places will be awarded on a first-come, first-served basis and you will receive email notification. However, there will also be a waiting list. If you are unable to take up your place, please NOTIFY US BY EMAIL IN GOOD TIME so that someone else on the list may be offered your place.

We are able to offer 2 postgraduate ‘Bibliographical Society Studentships’ of £60 each to assist with the cost of attending at the symposium. Postgraduate students who live outside London are eligible. To apply, please send a CV and a statement (200 words) to Mary.Shannon@roehampton.ac.uk by Friday 6th February explaining your current research and its relevance to the interests of the Romantic Illustration Network as well as to the aims of the Bibliographical Society. Successful applicants will be notified by Tuesday 10th February.

Subject to permissions, we are hoping to record proceedings for the benefit of those unable to attend.

Programme:
10.00 Registration: meet at Staff Entrance (see map) to transfer to Board Room
10.15
Rosie Dias (Warwick), ‘Viewers, Patrons, Readers, Consumers? John Boydell’s Shakespeare Gallery and its Public’
Ian Haywood (Roehampton), ‘Macklin’s Poets Gallery and the age of Terror’
11.45 tea and coffee
12.15 Luisa Calè (Birkbeck), ‘The Hours’
1-2 Lunch (attendees to make own arrangements)
2.00 Frederick Burwick (UCLA), ‘Painting and Performance: Tableaux Vivants on the London Stage’
3pm Tours of Print Room and Galleries, led by Tate facilitators
4.00 Martin Myrone (Tate), ‘Blake and the Limits of Illustration’
4.45 Open Discussion
5pm Close. Please join us for a drink nearby.

For a full programme and a map of the venue, visit https://romanticillustrationnetwork.wordpress.com/events/

CFP: Print Culture and the Arts

‘Print Culture and the Arts’
SHARP @ SAMLA
Durham, North Carolina
13-15 November 2015

Papers are invited for the SHARP affiliate session at the 2015 South
Atlantic Modern Language Association (SAMLA) Convention. Potential
topics include print culture, history of the book, authorship,
publishing history, ephemera, illustration, publishers’ archives,
circulation, and reception. Papers addressing this year’s theme, “In
Concert: Literature and the Other Arts” are especially welcome. What
connections can be made between print culture/book history and the
areas of visual art, theatre, and music? How has the relationship
between print culture and the arts evolved from the manuscript age to
the digital world of the 21st century?

The 87th annual SAMLA Convention will be held November 13-15, 2015, at
the Sheraton Imperial Hotel & Convention Center, located in Durham,
North Carolina. Proposers need not be members of SHARP to submit, but
panelists must be members of both SHARP and SAMLA in order to present.
By June 1, 2015, please email a 350-word abstract and short biography
(including contact information) to SHARP liaison Dr. Melissa Makala,
at me.makala@gmail.com.

Please also visit SHARP at SAMLA’s Facebook page for more updates:
https://www.facebook.com/SHARPatSAMLA

Image of the Month: Mutual undermining by “Boz” and Cruikshank?

Mutual undermining by “Boz” and Cruikshank?

Helen-Frances Pilkington (Birkbeck)

Mary L. Shannon’s paper, at the recent The Artist and the Writer RIN symposium, discussed how Dickens, in the guise of “Boz”, had used Cruikshank’s established visual persona to bolster his own. This led me to think about another “Boz” – Cruikshank relationship from August 1838 in Bentley’s Miscellany, where they had engaged in some mutual under-mining. The sketch in question was the ‘Full Report of the Second Meeting of the Mudfog Association for the Advancement of Everything’ which was ‘illustrated by George Cruikshank’.

Within this article is a discussion on the local beadle. “Boz” was given the chance to state his case first. Mr Sowster, the reader is informed, was a ‘fat man, with a more enlarged development of that peculiar conformation of countenance which is vulgarly termed a double chin.’ After some ‘unconstitutional proceedings’ in which Mr Sowster was employed as a bouncer for the Mudfog meeting, “Boz” announced that he had ‘procured a local artist to make a faithful sketch of the tyrant Sowster’. This likeness was ‘from the life, and complete in every respect. Even if I had been totally ignorant of the man’s real character, and had it been placed before me without remark, I should have shuddered involuntarily. There is an intense malignity of expression in the features, and a baleful ferocity of purpose in the ruffian’s eye, which appals and sickens. His whole air is rampant with cruelty, nor is the stomach less characteristic of his demoniac propensities.’ Such a description evokes terror, potentially comic, especially when considering the satirical trope of beadles.

As noted by Sally Ledger, one of the prototypes for Mr Bumble, the beadle in Oliver Twist (1837-1838), was Robert Seymour’s 1830 engraving ‘Heaven and Earth’ in which a beadle, in a cocked hat, flowing robes and staff, descends from the clouds to deny relief to starving paupers (Figure 1: bottom centre).

Figure 1: Robert Seymour, ‘Heaven & Earth’, 1830 © British Museum

Ledger noted that ‘this image of the Beadle as a pompously attired, self-important petty official that established a satirical genealogy upon which Dickens and Cruikshank would together build a few years later in Sketches by Boz and Oliver Twist‘. Given the “Boz”-ian text, the date and the article title proclaiming the Cruikshank illustrations, the expectation for the first readers would have been a continuation of this trope. However, the ‘faithful’ sketch by the ‘local artist’ in Bentley’s Miscellany turned out to be quite different (Figure 2):

Figure 2: George Cruikshank, 'The Tyrant Sowster', Bentley's Miscellany (1838) © Victoria and Albert Museum

Figure 2: George Cruikshank, ‘The Tyrant Sowster’, Bentley’s Miscellany (1838) © Victoria and Albert Museum

In Figure 2, Cruikshank has depicted Sowster as a benignly comic figure, all double-chin and belly with little arms and legs attached, rather than the ferocious tyrant per “Boz’s” description or the pompous petty official of the satirical stereotype. So who is right? Is the ‘local artist’ incapable of accurate sketching or has “Boz” been carried away by his rhetoric?

Helen-Frances Pilkington (Birkbeck)

Helen-Frances is a PhD student at Birkbeck focusing on hot air balloons and railways in the early nineteenth century

Sources:

Dickens, Charles; ‘The Second Report of the Mudfog Association for the Advancement of Everything’; Bentley’s Miscellany; 4; (August 1838); 209-227.

Ledger, Sally; ‘From Queen Caroline to Lady Deadlock: Dickens and the Popular Radical Imagination’; Victorian Literature and Culture; 32; (2004); 575-600.

Ashmolean Blake Exhibition: Lectures and Conferences

Members of the Illustration Network might be interested in the upcoming events associated with the Blake exhibition at the Ashmolean.

LECTURES

Towards a New Era in Printmaking: Innovation in the 18th Century With Dr Ad Stijnman FRHistS, private researcher, Ashmolean Lecture Theatre, Friday 16 January, 2-3pm £5/£4 concessions. Printmaking changed dramatically after 1700 with the introduction of new plate-making and plate-printing processes, coloured inks and state of the art print presses. Dr Stijnman looks at this era in which artists, printers, engravers and publishers produced work that astonished audiences. BOOK NOW AT http://www.ashmolean.org/exhibitions/whatsontickets/

Reading in the Spirit of Blake With Saree Makdisi, Professor of English and Comparative Studies at UCLA Ashmolean Lecture Theatre, Friday 23 January, 4.30-5.30pm £5/£4 concessions. This lecture explores the relationship between William Blake’s words and the images in his illustrated books and hopes to show you how to read ‘in the spirit of Blake’. Part of the ‘Inspired by Blake’ Festival. BOOK NOW AT http://www.ashmolean.org/exhibitions/whatsontickets/

Italian Old Master Prints Through the Eyes of Blake and His Friends With Michael Bury, University of Edinburgh. Ashmolean Lecture Theatre, Thursday 19 February, 2-3pm £5/£4 concessions. In the late 18th century, Blake and his contemporaries developed a distinctive approach to the study of Italian Renaissance prints. They paid attention to printmakers whose work has been largely ignored or disparaged in preceding years. This talk examines these artworks and identifies why Blake admired them so much. BOOK NOW AT http://www.ashmolean.org/exhibitions/whatsontickets/

CONFERENCE

Apprentice & Master: Conference With the University of Oxford’s Faculty of English and the Birkbeck Centre for 19th-century Studies. Ashmolean Lecture Theatre, Saturday 24 January, 10am-8pm £30/£25 concessions. Leading academics in the study of Blake will explore a variety of perspectives on the exhibition. The conference includes lunch and is followed by a reception and private viewing of the exhibition. BOOK NOW AT http://www.oxforduniversitystores.co.uk/