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The Romantic Illustration Network (RIN) restores to view the importance of book illustration and visual  culture in the Romantic period, but also across the Eighteenth and Nineteenth centuries. RIN brings together scholars working on poetry, prose, the printed book, visual culture, and painting from roughly 1750 – 1850 to share research and to develop new models for understanding the relationship between word and image in the period, between large and small scale work, and between painting, print and illustration.

We are collaborating with Tate Britain to enhance the Tate’s collection of literary prints and paintings. RIN will foreground artists who have been unduly ignored, and return attention to well-known artists in unfamiliar roles. We aim to recapture lost cultures of looking and of reading, restoring the link between word and image not only in book illustration but in the wider literary and visual culture.

Our programme of events will take as starting point in turn the artist, the author, the gallery and the economics of print. We will produce an edited collection of essays and it is hoped that this network will form the basis for a longer research project.

 

 

Recent Posts

CFA: ‘Illustration and Gender’

Dear Colleagues,

As you wrap up the end of your semester and look forward to the spring, I hope you will consider submitting an article to the Summer 2015 special issue of Nineteenth-Century Gender Studies on the topic of “Illustration and Gender.” We welcome articles of 5,000-8,000 words reflecting interdisciplinary approaches and international perspectives on illustration and gender studies. NCGS endorses a broad definition of gender studies, and we welcome submissions that consider nineteenth-century illustration and gender and sexuality in conjunction with race, class, place and nationality. The submission deadline for complete articles is March 15, 2015 (earlier submission is encouraged). We hope to address a variety of possible topics including but not limited to:

Studies of female illustrators of the nineteenth century

Critical histories of illustrators marked by gender and sexuality

Depictions of gender, race, sexuality, and/or class in illustrated literary works

Depictions of gender, race, sexuality, and/or class in illustrated advertisements

Illustration and gender in periodical publications

Illustration and gender in the novel

Illustration and gender in poetry

Illustration and gender in the fin-de-siècle

The influence of scientific theories and discoveries (phrenology, evolution, ethnography) on illustration and gender

Avenues opened up by the digital humanities for visualizing gender in nineteenth-century culture.

Please adhere to MLA style, using endnotes rather than footnotes, and include a coversheet with your contact information and a short (100-150 word) bio with your article submission. Please contain all identifying information to the coversheet. Feel free contact us at the email addresses listed below with any questions or concerns. You can find more information online at the following link, CFP: Illustration and Gender or please feel free to distribute the CFP to colleagues or graduate students who may be working at the intersections of nineteenth-century illustration and gender studies.

We look forward to reading your submissions!

Dr. Nicole Lobdell, Georgia Institute of Technology, nicole.lobdell@lmc.gatech.edu

Kate Holterhoff, Carnegie Mellon University, kholterh@andrew.cmu.edu

  1. Lecture: Rosie Dias (Warwick), ‘From Counting House to Country House: Building the Image of the East India Company’ Leave a reply
  2. Update to the William Blake Archive Leave a reply
  3. New Romantic Circles Praxis Volume: Romantic Visualities Leave a reply
  4. Event Report: ‘The Artist and the Writer’, IES, 29th November 2014. Supported by the British Association of Victorian Studies and the University of Roehampton. Leave a reply
  5. ‘The Artist and the Writer': room confirmation Leave a reply
  6. ‘The Artist and the Writer’, Sat. 29th November: REVISED PROGRAMME Leave a reply
  7. ‘Lost Visions’ Workshop Report: Cardiff, 4th November 2014 Leave a reply
  8. Guest Lecture: ‘A Private Space as Visual Text in 17th-century England’ University of Tampa, FL. Leave a reply
  9. CFP: ‘James Gillray@200: Caricaturist without a Conscience?’ Oxford, March 2015 1 Reply